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Representative Cases

Connecticut - $3,000,000 Commercial Real Estate Purchase

We recently closed the file on a $3,000,000 purchase of a commercial real estate property in Connecticut.  Our client expressed his appreciation of our work on this deal and a prior matter:

 I am confident that if not for your people skills with _____________ this deal would never have happened. The first time you represented me with the [prior matter] you got me out of very hot water.  And I couldn't be happier with your (sic) all you did for this deal. 

 Details are omitted to preserve confidentiality.  We're appreciative and grateful that our client took the time to let us know how we did.


Connecticut Banking Law - Dispute and Settlement with a National Bank

In a recent case, our firm negotiated a favorable settlement on behalf of a client with the credit card subsidiary of a major national bank.  In addition to receiving money to settle the case, the client recouped all of his attorneys' fees and expenses.  Names are omitted here to preserve confidentiality.

The client had moved out of the country for a job opportunity.  He sent a change of address letter to the bank.  He engaged a third-party debt-settlement firm to negotiate the satisfaction of a credit card debt.  He agreed to pay the negotiated settlement amount and did pay the settlement amount to satisfy the credit card debt.  He was sued anyway.  When commencing the suit, the bank directed a State Marshal to serve a summons and complaint at the client's vacant house in Connecticut -- literally thousands of miles from his then actual home. 

The client counterclaimed under the abusive collection practices statute (CGS §36a-648).  Ultimately, the bank, through its attorney, settled the case "amicably."


Employment Law - Reinstatement of Government Employee

 We helped a hard-working federal government employee win reinstatement to her job and achieve vindication after a premature suspension.  Our client was accused -- but not tried, let alone, convicted -- of a serious crime.  We worked in coordination with criminal defense counsel to prevent the loss of pay, job status and morale while charges were appropriately addressed. 

 We are pleased to report that both the criminal charges and the employment issues were resolved satisfactorily for our client who is back at work without loss of pay or status.

 

Trusts and Estaes - IRS Audit

 We represented the Executors of a 20 million dollar estate through an IRS audit of the estate tax return.  Working with the Estate's accountant and a co-counsel, we established a professional working relationship with the auditor and were able to fully document and explain all aspects of the tax return.  This matter presented a significant issue when we discovered a consultant had over-valued an asset and the Executors had to file an amended return to claim a refund.  The IRS agreed with us on that issue and we were able to resolve other issues raised by the audit to the satisfaction of our clients, the Executors -- and the IRS.

 
Trusts and Estates - Undoing a 20-year Error

 We drew on our expertise in both New York and Connecticut law to help a family undo a 20-year error in two deeds and quiet title to a Connecticut real estate property.  The property had been in the family even longer, more like 40 years.  But, over 20 years ago, when a parent tried to pass the property to the next generation, a New York lawyer drafted two deeds, each with a provision that would have been legally sufficient in New York but not in Connecticut -- we'll spare you the technicalities but attorneys and others who are curious can send us an inquiry through the "Contact Us" feature of this website.

 As a result, we had to go back 15-20 years to research the history of two closed estates.  Clearing title involved researching the status of estate tax and succession tax laws over the last 15-20 years (which have done nothing but change over that time), determining the value 20 years ago of a property that had not sold for about 40 years and commencing an appropriate proceeding in Probate Court.

Happily, with the assistance, patience and cooperation of the clerks of a New York Surrogate's Court and of a Connecticut Probate Court, title was cleared, title insurance was issued and the family was able to sell and transfer the property as planned. 


Connecticut Breach of Contract for Unpaid Pension Benefits

We successfully sued for breach of contract when a Connecticut volunteer firefighter was wrongfully expelled from a fire company after he complained that pension benefits to which he was entitled were not properly credited to him. The volunteer fire company had the duty to keep accurate attendance records of plaintiff's responses to fires and ambulance calls. The attendance records were used to credit firefighters and volunteer ambulance personnel with pension benefits. Attendance records were missing, those that were found were incorrect; some were altered. After an 11-day trial, a Connecticut jury found that the fire company and the local municipality, which was the pension plan administrator, breached its contract with the firefighter and was negligent in recording his attendance at fire and ambulance calls. The jury awarded the firefighter $72,000 for the loss of his pension and other benefits.


New York Real Estate Dispute

After a 13-day trial, a New York jury verdict rejected a claim to ownership and use of a portion of our client's real property. The claim had been based on the principles of "adverse possession" or "prescriptive easement." These involve rights that can accrue over time when owners are inattentive to the use and occupation of their property by others.


Connecticut Fraud and Contract Claim

We settled a Connecticut case for fraud and breach of contract in which our client received over twice the amount originally claimed in the suit, since our client also sued for "punitive damages." Under Connecticut law, punitive damages are generally limited to paying the other side's attorneys' fees and costs. These would have increased if the case had gone to trial, putting the defendant at a greater risk of loss.


New York Employment Defamation Claim

We settled a New York case brought by our client, a professional chef, against his corporate employer, its owner and its managers for defamation. Our client was falsely accused and then dismissed for stealing wine from the private collection of a celebrity guest at a catered event.

Connecticut Unfair Trade Practices Act

We successfully brought suit against a home improvement contractor who contracted to build an extension to our client's home and then failed to complete the renovation. The home improvement contractor's work was also so shoddy that a substantial portion of the renovation had to be dismantled and rebuilt by another contractor.

Contact us today for more information.

Rogers & Tartaro, LLP 

Connecticut Office:

158 Danbury Road, Suite 8
Ridgefield, Connecticut 06877
Telephone: 203-431-6646
Fax: 203-431-6686
Map & Directions

New York Office:

1025 Westchester Avenue, Suite 402
White Plains, New York 10604
Telephone: 914-682-3390
Fax: 203-431-6686
Map & Directions

 
 

At the Ridgefield, CT, and White Plains, NY, law offices of Rogers & Tartaro, we represent clients throughout New York and Connecticut, including Bedford, Goldens Bridge, Katonah, Lewisboro, New York City, Redding, Stamford, Weston, Wilton, Westchester County and Fairfield County.

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for individual advice regarding your own situation.

Copyright © 2009 by Rogers & Tartaro, LLP Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. You may reproduce materials available at this site for your own personal use and for non-commercial distribution. All copies must include this copyright statement.



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